Norwegian Cruise Line Announces Ban of Towel Animals, World Mourns

Towel animals, a staple of any respectable cruise ship, will no longer be a daily occurrence for customers of Norwegian Cruise Line, as part of a new trial to protect the world’s resources.

That feeling when you return to your room at the end of a long, fun-filled day and find a pair of swans, baby elephants, a hippo or a bear on your bed, made entirely out of towels. That feeling will be history for most customers of the cruise line, according to Vice President of Public Relations Christine Da Silva, speaking to USA Today

The company is trying to be more environmental-friendly and that means cutting down on waste. Making towel animals every single day means washing the towels daily, even if they haven’t been used. That translates into waste, so it will be cut. 

“We are committed to being a responsible corporate citizen by fostering a culture of awareness and respect for our world’s resources. Our mission is to continually improve our sustainability culture through fresh innovation, progressive education and open collaboration,” Da Silva says. “As such, from time to time we explore opportunities to expand our efforts. In this instance, we are assessing the impact of reducing the number of towel animals we showcase aboard a few of our ships.”

There’s a catch, though. This is just a limited test, so customers who still want towel animals can get them on a daily basis, if only they make their desire known to staff. 
“We understand that many of our guests enjoy them as part of the experience of cruising with us, so towel animals remain available upon request,” Da Silva adds. “This is simply a test, and we are providing them if guests request them.”

Despite this, customers aren’t happy and they’ve taken to social media to make themselves heard by Norwegian Cruise Line. Sarcastically or seriously, they say it’s the little things that keep customers happy and towel animals count among them. They also say they can’t imagine a good cruise without them, so it doesn’t look like the company’s trial is starting on a good footing.