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Norway gunman phoned police "10 times", Police never called back, Chose to keep shooting
[12.08.2011, 08:42am, Fri. GMT]
The Norwegian man who has admitted to two attacks that last month killed 77 people said he phoned police '10 times' before his arrest, his attorney Geir Lippestad said Friday. Anders Behring Breivik this week told police that 'he phoned police well before his arrest. He said he phoned 10 times but only got through twice,' Lippestad told the Aftenposten daily.

Breivik identified himself as 'commander and used his full name,' Lippestad said, adding that Breivik said he had wanted to hand himself over and 'used the word 'surrender' - and asked police to confirm that this was accepted.'


The calls were placed from the Utoya island, the scene of a shooting rampage at a Labour Party youth camp that left 69 dead.

While waiting for the police to call back, Breivik paused in the shooting. He considered 'taking his life or continuing with what he called his operation, and decided to continue until police arrived,' Lippestad said.

Breivik has since indicated that he was pleased that his acts of violence had succeeded, according to Mr Rachlew, who has an MSc in forensic psychology from the University of Liverpool.  

"He was not looking forward to the day of the operation because he knew it was going to be hard. But he had a mission. There was a lot of planning. It was hard work and it succeeded. He has a satisfaction that all his preparations, all his determination, ended in success." 

According to Breivik's lawyer, the killer spared two youths on Utoya because they looked too young.

"He believes the two were between 14 and 16 years old. I will not go into more detail than that," Geir Lippestad, the defence counsel, told NRK, Norway's public broadcaster.
 
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